Monthly Archives: September 2015

Kilo

1. nvt. Stargazer, reader of omens, seer, astrologer, necromancer; kind of looking glass (rare); to watch closely, spy, examine, look around, observe, forecast. Cf. hākilo and below. Kilo aupuni, political expert. Kilo ʻuala, to examine sweet potatoes as in a new mound in … Continue reading

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Hoʻonui ʻike

Enrichment; to enrich, i.e., to increase knowledge. I love the fact that we are never to old to learn (and the adage that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks means nothing to me). I relish opportunities to hoʻonui … Continue reading

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Hōʻā

1. vt. To set on fire, burn, ignite, etc. (See ʻā 1. nvi. Fiery, burning; fire; to burn, blaze. Fig., to glitter or sparkle, as a gem; to burn, as with jealousy or anger. Hōʻā is comprised of hō which is a causative and ʻā … Continue reading

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ʻOle

1. n.v. Not, without, lacking; to deny; zero, nothing, nought, negative; nothingness, nobody; im-, in-, un-. Cf. ʻaʻole, mea ʻole, ʻoleloa. Maikaʻi ʻole, not good; bad. Paʻa ka ʻole i ka waha, holds “no” in the mouth. Na wai e ʻole ka hoʻohihi i ka nani o Leahi? Who … Continue reading

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Malama

1. n. Light, month, moon. (PPN ma(a)rama, malama.) 2. conj. Perhaps. Malama ulu mai ka ʻanoʻano, perhaps the seeds will grow. Another name for moon, besides mahina, is malama. Please don’t confuse this word with mālama, meaning to care for. While … Continue reading

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Mahina

1. Moon, month; moonlight. 2. Crescent-shaped fishhook. 3. Eye of the snail at the end of its horn. 4. Farm, plantation, patch. 5. A variety of onion, similar to silver onion. 6. A variety of sweet potato. It is no … Continue reading

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Hopena

n. Result, conclusion, sequel, ending, destiny, fate, consequence, effect, last. Sometimes (actually, a lot of times) the Hawaiian language is so much simpler and to the point than English. Let’s use today’s He Momi for example. Look at all the … Continue reading

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