Mākaʻikaʻi

To visit, the sights; to stroll, make a tour, take a walk; to look upon (Puk. 3.4); spectator. 

And off I go! Uihā! Two years ago, I traveled with my mom, and seven other members of my family all the way to Denmark (talk about a   l o n g  flight, especially since our ages ranged from 4 – 84). We went to kipa (visit) the motherland. Literally.  My mom is FROM Denmark. Visiting a country with a total of nine in the group can be quite a challenge but it was an unforgettable journey, a wonderful huakaʻi.

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Loving and remembering our mauna in Sweden with six of the nine

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All nine of us at Torvehallerne, a wonderful market in Copenhagen, our favorite stop

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Hawaiʻi and Danish Family

This week I make the journey again, although instead of table for nine, it is just a table for four. All able-bodied adults. This time around, it will be go go go, visiting family, enjoying food, sightseeing, in the true sense of mākaʻikaʻi. I intend to visit, sightsee, stroll, tour, walk, do it all. Mākaʻikaʻi in all its glory.  I am going to mākaʻikaʻi hele, to stroll here and there.

Wish me well, my friends.

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

 

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Hoʻomanaʻo

To remember, recall, commemorate, reflect deeply on, meditate.

Today marks the 9th anniversary of the passing of my dad, Shermaih Kahuakai Iaea, Jr. He died exactly one month before his birthday and his funeral was held exactly one week later on the birthday of my oldest grandchild.

Forever on this day, I will hoʻomanaʻo my dad. He had a tattoo on his arm that said SKI and for the longest time I had no idea why. Finally figured out it was his initials. He also had what looked like a self made tattoo of a cross on his hand between his thumb and pointer finger. I was his “Princess”, so much so that there was a time kids from the neighborhood would come to the door and ask for Princess because that is what he called me. He loved my kids and they loved him. I miss him everyday. I hear his voice. I see his smile. And I feel the warmth of his hugs. Oh I remember the maybe not so good stuff, too, that we all have. It is an entire package. But today I remember the laugh and hugs and crunching sound of him eating raw crab. Usually from Tamuras. And drawing out the word, “H e   l l oooooo” whenever we talked on the phone.

It is amazing how just a simple reflection, hoʻomanaʻo, of my dad causes tears to well up in my eyes. It is a haliʻa aloha, a fond remembrance, for sure.

This is one of my favorite pics of my dad. He loved to hoʻomanaʻo his younger days, how naughty he was, always getting in fights during his years at Kamehameha. And, most fondly how he loved spending his summers in Manaʻe with his ʻohana.

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Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Puna

1. n. Spring (of water). Cf. pūnāwai. Puna-hou (place), new spring. Wai puna, spring water. (PPN puna.) 2. n. Coral, lime, plaster, mortar, whitewash, calcium; coral container, as for dye, coral rubber. E lawe ʻo ia i ka puna hou e hamo i ka hale (Oihk. 14.42), and he shall take new plaster and plaster the house. (PPN punga.) 3. n. Section between joints or nodes, as of bamboo or sugar cane. 4. n. Cuttlebone, as of octopus. 5. Short for kupuna as a term of address. 6. Short for punalua. hoʻo.puna Same as hoʻopunalua. 7. vi. To paddle with the hands, as to start a surfboard on its way to catch a wave. Rare. 8. n. Spoon (preceded by ke). Eng. Ke iho ihola ke puna, the spoon is let down [the lower lip, of a pouter].

Now here is a useful word.  Let’s go through some of the meanings:

Spring (as water).  From this we get place names such as Punahou, the name of the private  school in Honolulu, but many don’t know that the school’s name is really named after the area in which it is located. It is here that the god Kāne thrust his staff into the ground to get water. According to another story, an old couple lived by a hala (pandanus) tree and each dreamed of a spring; when the man offered red fish and pulled up the hala (pandanus) tree, water oozed out. The seal of Punahou School depicts a hala tree, pool, and lūʻau (taro leaves).

Coral, plaster, etc.  In fact, this is the word you can use for a cast, like when you break your arm.

We don’t have sugarcane here like we used to, but it is nice to know those nodes/joints are puna!  Loaʻa nā puna ma ke kō a me ka ʻohe – There are nodes on sugarcane () and bamboo (ʻohe).

My moʻopuna (grandchildren) refer to me as Puna.  Nice to know that it is actually recognized in the Hawaiian  dictionary!  Another choice for all you kupuna out there!

Punalua – Now here is a term we don’t get to use nowadays.  This is the term for the relationship between two people (or possibly more) who share the same spouse.  In pre-missionary times, Hawaiians, aliʻi in particular, practiced polygamy.  And generally, the relationship between two people who shared the same spouse was one of genuine love and caring.  In fact, to be jealous of your punalua was frowned upon.  And a lot of times, your punalua might also be your sibling (kuaʻana or kaina).

Surfers out there might like to know that puna is the term used when they are paddling to catch a wave!  E puna! PADDLE!

Puna, for spoon, may be the translation we use most often when we say puna.  For those more familiar with Hawaiian, this is an exception to the ka/ke rule.  A ke will precede puna for spoon (ke puna) but ka will precede puna for spring (as well as the other meanings – ka puna).

Here are some ʻōlelo noʻeau using the word puna:

Punaluʻu (spring dived for), i ke kai kau haʻa a ka malihini

Punaluʻu, where the sea dances for the visitors.

Hoʻi ka wai a ka puna noho mai

The water returns to the spring and there remains (said of one who withdraws).

ʻIno ka moana ke ahu mōkākī nei ka puna i uka

The sea is rough, for the corals are stewn on the beach  (here are all the indications that there is trouble yonder).

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Adress inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Holomua

Improvement, progress. To improve.

This is the time. Graduations abound. Students are completing one chapter in their lives, gearing up for the next chapter. It never ends, right? Holomua. Progressing. Moving forward.

Holomua is comprised of two words: holo – to go; mua – forward. Go forward.

I love signing my graduation cards with this word. HOLOMUA!

It is a perfect word for those who have are doing big things in their lives. A good reminder to keep going!

It is also a good word for those who are meeting difficult challenges. They need to be encouraged to holomua. That’s the more difficult one, right? If you are up against some negativity or you have issues going on, sometimes it is SO VERY HARD to holomua. But you must. One small step at a time. Go forward. Sometimes my friends and I joke (because sometimes we have to) and instead of saying holomua we say kolomua (kolo meaning to crawl). Sometimes it feels like when hard times hit the moving forward is such a slow process. Instead of running forward we feel like we are crawling, on hands and knees, like a baby. But that is okay, too. Main thing it is in the mua direction. Keep going forward.

Pūpūkahi i holomua – Unite in order to progress.

Don’t you like this ʻōlelo noʻeau? Hawaiians got it going on. They know the way to get ahead is to work together.

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Makuahine

n. Mother, aunt, female cousin or relative of parents’ generation.

Makua – parent

Hine – short for wahine, woman.

This Sunday, Lāpule, we celebrate all makuahine, all the mamas out there and that includes your mom, aunties and all the female cousins of that same generation. They are, after all, your makuahine, from a Hawaiian perspective. And I love the concept.  I have always felt that all women who nurture the children  should be honored on this special day. Some women who may not have bore or adopted children (I want to write borned because I know you will all know what I mean) have been makuahine to the keiki in their lives.

I know many a kumu (teacher, whether it is in school, hula, art) who are more nurturing than some children’s own mothers. I know some who are perfect complements to the mothers. And as a makuahine myself, I know that I have relied on a handful of close females in my generation to provide my keiki with the guidance and soft touch that I lacked as a busy working makuahine of four keiki.

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Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Hoku

n. Night of the full moon. When this moon set before daylight it was called Hoku Palemo, Hoku that slips away. When it set after daylight it was called Hoku Ili, grounded Hoku. (Malo 32.) Cf. hōkū, star. Ka mahina o Hoku, the full moon of the night Hoku. (PEP (F,S)otu.) (Pukui)

Tonight is the mahina Hoku. Go take a look. Big and round. Hoku is the 15th moon of the cycle. I love a mahina piha (full moon) night. The trees are visible, and there is a lot of energy in the air, hopefully put to good use. It is a good time for planting. I didn’t get my kumquat in the ground on the hua night but I will try for tonight, weather permitting. Tomorrow is going to be my last chance. Tomorrow is Māhealani. If it doesn’t get in the ground tomorrow, that buggah is going to stay in its current pot for one more month.

Dont confuse the name of tonight’s moon with the word, hōkū, which means star. Two different words! All made different by the pronunciation.

Nui nā hōkū i ka lani me ka mahina Hoku – There are many stars in the sky with the Hoku moon.

Take a look at what is blooming right now where you are. Then revisit next Hoku moon and see what has changed. Right now the lehua trees in my yard are going CRAZY with pua! It is like  fire in my trees! And my lilikoʻi are just starting to flower. I wish I had mango but my place is way too cold but I know mangoes are looking like my picture down below. Moni ka haʻae – my mouth is watering!

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Hua

1. nvi. Fruit, tuber, egg, produce, yield, ovum, seed, grain, offspring; meat as in ʻopihi shell or ʻalamihi crab; to bear fruit, tuber or seed; to bear a child; fruitful. 

2. n. Round object, as pill or bead.

3. n. Result, effect; credit, as for a university course. 

4. n. Testicles.

5. Same as huahua 3, a vulgar gesture. 

6. nvi. Word, letter, figure, watchword, rallying cry, note in music; winning word in the Chinese gambling game of chee-fah; type; to speak.

7. (Cap.) n. Name of the thirteenth night of the lunar month. 

8. (Cap.) Name of a star

9. n. The bulging of the broadest part of a paddle blade.

That’s a lot of meanings for such a small three letter word, isn’t it?

Today’s focus is on #1 & #7.

Hua is the Hawaiian word for fruit and egg as well as the 13th night of the lunar month. Check out the moon and it looks like an egg. It seriously does. Perfect your kilo (observation) of the mahina hua (hua moon).

I bought a kumquat tree yesterday at the open market. I had been keeping an eye on it for quite some time but knowing that we were on the cusp of the hua moon I finally decided to pull the trigger and buy it. That way I can plant it today and, entrusting the spirit of the moon to help my kumquat tree bear many a hua, I can ensure it will feed my ʻohana for years to come. I am pretty excited at the prospect and cannot wait. Remind me to update you on the “fruitfulness” of my kumquat tree in a couple years.

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Hua moa – chicken egg

Huaʻai – general term for fruit (edible hua)

huaale – pill (literally-seed to swallow)

ʻAʻohe hua o ka maiʻa i ka lā hoʻokahi – Banans do not fruit in a single day (don’t be impatient).

He hua kahi – A single seed (an only child).

He maiʻa ke kanaka a ka lā e hua ai – A man is like a banana tree on the day it bears its fruit. (One can tell hat kind of man he is by his deeds).

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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