Hua

1. nvi. Fruit, tuber, egg, produce, yield, ovum, seed, grain, offspring; meat as in ʻopihi shell or ʻalamihi crab; to bear fruit, tuber or seed; to bear a child; fruitful. 

2. n. Round object, as pill or bead.

3. n. Result, effect; credit, as for a university course. 

4. n. Testicles.

5. Same as huahua 3, a vulgar gesture. 

6. nvi. Word, letter, figure, watchword, rallying cry, note in music; winning word in the Chinese gambling game of chee-fah; type; to speak.

7. (Cap.) n. Name of the thirteenth night of the lunar month. 

8. (Cap.) Name of a star

9. n. The bulging of the broadest part of a paddle blade.

That’s a lot of meanings for such a small three letter word, isn’t it?

Today’s focus is on #1 & #7.

Hua is the Hawaiian word for fruit and egg as well as the 13th night of the lunar month. Check out the moon and it looks like an egg. It seriously does. Perfect your kilo (observation) of the mahina hua (hua moon).

I bought a kumquat tree yesterday at the open market. I had been keeping an eye on it for quite some time but knowing that we were on the cusp of the hua moon I finally decided to pull the trigger and buy it. That way I can plant it today and, entrusting the spirit of the moon to help my kumquat tree bear many a hua, I can ensure it will feed my ʻohana for years to come. I am pretty excited at the prospect and cannot wait. Remind me to update you on the “fruitfulness” of my kumquat tree in a couple years.

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Hua moa – chicken egg

Huaʻai – general term for fruit (edible hua)

huaale – pill (literally-seed to swallow)

ʻAʻohe hua o ka maiʻa i ka lā hoʻokahi – Banans do not fruit in a single day (don’t be impatient).

He hua kahi – A single seed (an only child).

He maiʻa ke kanaka a ka lā e hua ai – A man is like a banana tree on the day it bears its fruit. (One can tell hat kind of man he is by his deeds).

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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ʻOle

1. n.v. Not, without, lacking; to deny; zero, nothing, nought, negative; nothingness, nobody; im-, in-, un-. 

2. (Cap.) For nights of the moon beginning with ʻOle. Collectively these nights were called nā ʻOle; they were considered unlucky for fishing, planting, or beginning any important activity because ʻole also means nothing. 

Today’s mahina, or moon, is ʻOlekūlua. There are four moons as it is waxing that are known as ʻOle moon: ʻOlekūkahi, ʻOlekūlua,ʻOlekūkolu, ʻOlepau. And there are three ʻOle moons on the waning: ʻOlekūkahi, ʻOlekūlua, ʻOlepau.

Keep in mind what #2 says above. Unproductive is the word that stands out. If you can’t seem to finish off projects you started or you are unsuccessful in your tasks, you might want to check if it is an ʻOle kind of moon. More often than not, it may be an ʻOle moon. Your best of the days would be ʻOlepau. ʻOle is pau (finished) so go for it. You may experiences some success.

Eia kākou i nā ʻOle – here we are at the ʻOle nights [a time of poor luck].

But for now, best bet is to not start any big projects. Wait two more days. But you should be getting your fruits trees/plants ready because shortly, as the moon becomes fuller and fuller, you will want to plant, plant, plant!

If you want more information on the kaulana mahina (moon phases/calendar), click here for a plethora of information. This is a reputable site. I try my best not to steer my followers down a dead end street or a wrong turn. And trust me when I say there are wrong turns out there. And anything you may see that is written, produced, supported by Kalei Nuuhiwa, that is reputable. She is the kilo extraordinaire of all things Papahulilani – all things in the sky, including the moon and clouds. Many profess to know. She know. She knows way more than that, but I want to focus on that.

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Haku

1. n. Lord, master, overseer, employer, owner, possessor, proprietor. A chief was often addressed as ē kuʻu haku, my master. See Haku-o-Hawaiʻi. Kona haku, his lord. ʻO Iēhowa ka Haku (Isa. 50.5), the Lord Jehovah. hoʻo.haku To act as haku, dominate; to treat as a haku; to rule others, sometimes without authority; bossy. ʻA ʻole ʻoe e hoʻohaku maluna ona me ka ʻoʻolea (Oihk. 25.43), you shall not rule over him with rigor. (PCP fatu.)

2. vt. To compose, invent, put in order, arrange; to braid, as a lei, or plait, as feathers. Cf. haku mele. Ka mahiole ʻie i haku ʻia i ka hulu o nā ʻiʻiwi (Laie 479), plaited helmet made with ʻiʻiwi feathers. (PPN fatu.)

3. n. Core, lump, as of poi; stone, coconut sponge. Cf. pōhaku, haku maka, haku ʻōnohi. Haku ipu, pulp and seeds of melon. Haku kā koʻi (Malo 51), stone for chipping. (PPN fatu.)

I figure that since May Day (May 1) is Lei Day in Hawaiʻi, I will focus on a style of lei making.

There are different styles of lei making: kui (sewn, like a plumeria or pīkake lei); hilo (twisted or braided, like ti leaf lei); wili (greenery is secured onto a backing using a wrapping method);  hili (braiding with one type of greenery, like palapalai fern); and haku (braiding with more than one greenery). And that is what I learned growing up. Everyone tends to just put all lei that are NOT sewn into the haku category.

Just keep in mind the STYLE in which the lei is made. Is it twisted, like the ti leaf lei below? That is hilo. Are there a variety of materials used in one lei? Then it is probably wili (materials fastened to a backing by wrapping it, usually) or perhaps it is a haku (if the materials are braided into the lei).

 

Consider wearing a lei on Monday, May Day. No matter the style, no matter what you call it, get in the spirit of wearing a lei, giving a lei and celebrating the beauty of it all. I would love it if we could bring back the old time memories of Lei Day when, no matter what day of the week it fell on, you could be assured that people would be dressed in aloha attire and donning a lei all day long. And why not? A reason to celebrate our beautiful flora.

E lei kau, e lei hoʻoilo i ke aloha – Love is worn like a lei through the summers and the winters (it is everlasting).

E lei nō au i ko aloha – I will wear your love as a lei (I will cherish your love as a beautiful adornment).

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Hilo

1. nvt. To twist, braid, spin; twisted, braided; threadlike; faint streak of light.

2. (Cap.) n. First night of the new moon. See Malo 35. (PCP filo.)

3. (Cap.) n. Name of a famous Polynesian navigator for whom the city and district may have been named. 

4. Same as mauʻu HiloHilo grass.

5. n. Gonorrhea; a running sore (Oihk. 15.3).

6. n. A variety of sweet potato.

And not to mention one of my favorite towns in Hawaiʻi paeʻāina, HILO!

Hilo was rocking last week with Merrie Monarch in full force. That must be why the word is on my mind.

Hilo, as a common noun, is most often used when referring to a style of lei making known as hilo, today most often done with lāʻī, or ti leaf.

Today’s moon is also Hilo. That first sliver of moon after a no moon night. That is Hilo. Look up. That sliver brings Hilo all the way to you. Sad you cannot be in Hilo town? There it is. In the sky. Hilo. Oh, and today’s Hilo moon also brings us into a new month, that of Ikiiki which means humid. Oh oh.

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Ua hilo ʻia i ke aho a ke aloha – braided with the cords of love.

ʻEleʻele Hilo, panopano i ka ua – Dark is Hilo, clouded with the rain.

ʻAʻohe sananā, he mauʻu hilo – Nothing to shout about, it is only hilo grass (said of a trifling matter that is not worth fussing over).

Hala ka Puʻulena aia i Hilo, ua ʻimi akula iā Papalauahi – The Puʻulena breeze is gone to Hilo in search of Papalauahi (said of one who has gone away or of one who finds himself too late to do anything).

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

 

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ʻAʻa i ka hula, waiho ka hilahila ma ka hale

When one wants to dance the hula, bashfulness should be left at home

Many of us in Hawaiʻi, and definitely the majority of those who live in Hilo, are still recuperating from an incredible Merrie Monarch Week. Wow. Talk about reaching a level of professionalism and perfection while maintaining the true focus of hula — telling a story using all of the senses.

If you were watching the performances on television/livestream, surely you could tell that there was not a shy person on stage. Each competitor projected the joy of dancing hula and the manaʻo (thought/feeling) of the mele (song/chant). Dancers were transformed to a place, a time, embodying the spirit of the mele. It was beautiful.

So let us take this ʻōlelo noʻeau a step further — beyond hula — to any other art form, whether it is a visual art, a performance art, a sport, a skill.

One must leave any form of shame or embarrassment behind and just GO FOR IT. As an educator, I have seen students hold back from meeting their potential because of fear. But more than that, I think of myself as a student and how much I didn’t do certain things because I was too embarrassed.

I recently read an article about masters in their craft, such as pianists or violinists and how, many times, they are not incredibly talented by means of genetics or giftedness but moreso because they put in thousands upon thousands of hours of practice. When they make mistakes or have a difficult challenge, they don’t give up. They put in more hours. Hard to do that when you shame. GO FOR IT.

So have you been thinking about learning hula?  Go for it! Want to master the art of feather lei making? Or how about kapa making? DO IT!!! E waiho ka hilahila ma ka hale – Leave your embarrassment at home.

No be shame!

Photos courtesy of Star Advertiser

 

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Mele Manaka

Merrie Monarch

Competition begins tonight, Gang! Oh, the excitement in the air!!! I cannot even think about anything else and I am not even on the stage. The buzz around Hilo is incredible. If you aren’t there, you are SQUARE. Or extremely sad. Or just not part of the hula Hawaiian music community.

Want to livestream it? Click here

Check out some great photos here.

And if you are at home and you are going to watch the competition on tv or via livestream, check out the Merrie Haiku page on Facebook. It is where it is at to share your joy, what you love, how you’re feeling, via poetry.

Don’t know anything about Mele Manaka? Book your flight to Hilo next year, on Easter Sunday, and stay the week. Good luck booking a hotel. It is a week of free entertainment around town, craft fairs galore, hula dancers in droves, lei, flowers, food, and fun.

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Hālau o Kekuhi performing at Hōʻike last night. Perfection.

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PC: Kuʻulei Kanahele

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Pūpūkahi i Holomua

Unite in order to progress

Pūpūkahi – United, as in harmonious co-operation

Holomua – improvement, progress

Every Monday I share an ʻōlelo noʻeau, a Hawaiian wise saying, with a teacher colleague of mine, one that she can share with the student body at her school on Monday morning. I try to think of sayings that students can relate to, that she can personalize and perhaps help the students make connections.

Western culture teaches us that it is every man for himself. Only the strong survive. Be independent.

Hawaiian culture teaches us that it really does take a village. If you don’t have others to rely on and other who rely on you, it really make life a challenge.

Hawaiian culture teaches us that rather than being independent and work alone we should strive to be interdependent. Maybe you don’t NEED anyone else, and maybe no one needs you, but isn’t it nice that if you needed help someone would be there for you and vice versa? Isn’t it great to help out a family member, friend or neighbor when they need it?

Recently, my daughter got married. And while it would have been easier to hire people to do the flowers and get a caterer, the day was extra special because of the help our family and friends gave willingly, without expecting anything in return. The food. The decorations. The drinks. Everything. It is a thing of beauty, this teamwork.

As a canoe paddler, I know that the only way you can win, heck, the only way you can reach your destination, is if you paddle together. ʻIlau hoe. Paddle together.

Pūpūkahi i holomua. Who is it that you must unite with in your professional AND your personal life in order to get the best outcome? What can you do in order to progress in small and big ways? And what can you do to help others reach their goals?

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Poʻalima Hemolele

Good Friday

Some of you are at home today, enjoying a much needed break in the name of a holiday. When I was working in the school system, I know I enjoyed the holiday.  But now I don’t work in the school system OR get the holiday. I will work on Poʻalima Hemolele and make sure it is extra good for me.

Poʻalima – Fifth night

Hemolele – perfect, holy, flawless

You might also hear Good Friday being referred to as Poʻalima Maikaʻi since maikaʻi literally means good.

Regardless of your religious or spiritual beliefs, have a Poʻalima Hemolele today AND every Poʻalima.

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Lā Pākoa

Easter (Catholic)

I am not Catholic but I use Lā Pākoa. In fact everyone I know who refers to Easter in Hawaiian uses Lā Pākoa. It is either that or Ka lā i hoʻāla hou ai ka Haku (the day the Lord has risen). Which would you choose? I rest my case. I go for path of least resistance most of the time. Can you guess what the word Pākoa means? Give it a try. And the answer shall be revealed below.

Hauʻoli Lā Pākoa – Happy Easter.

E noho ana au ma ka hale ma ka Lā Pākoa – I am going to stay home on Easter.

ʻO kēia ka lā i hoʻāla hou ai ka Haku – Today is the day the Lord has risen.

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Answer:  Passover (Did you get it?)

Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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Hoʻokuʻu

 To release, let go, put down, dismiss, send away, abandon, disperse, adjourn; to expel, as from school; to discharge, as from work; to free, acquit, let, permit, excuse, exempt, liberate; to settle, clear up.

Prologue: I intended to post today’s “He Momi” this past Friday, the day prior to my daughter’s big wedding celebration. You know how stressful those preparations can be, right? And even if I only had a small kuleana (responsibility), I think the bigger stress is just hoping that everything goes JUST RIGHT for your own child so that the day is really the best day ever. Memorable and filled with love and joy. And it was. But I will go ahead and leave the thoughts down below, and you can rest easy knowing it couldn’t have been any better.

Remember Tuesday? ʻAloʻahia. Stress. Emotional stress. Today? Hoʻokuʻu – LET IT GO!! Kuʻu, besides being the possessive “my” (as in the well known name, Kuʻuipo – my sweetheart), also means release, dismiss, settle. Hoʻokuʻu – Cause that release to happen. Like I said, LET IT GO.

So I am letting it go. I am going to enjoy the weekend because I am sure all the hard work and ʻaloʻahia will pay off in a beautiful celebration of marriage for Kika and Ivan.

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Copyright: 2017 – Liana Iaea Honda. All rights reserved. All versions of “He Momi e Lei ai”, in its entirety, past and present, is the property of L. K. I. Honda. Reproduction and use of any kind other than the sharing of this website is prohibited without written consent. Alteration to the original content in any form is prohibited in every and any instance, and use in any other variant is prohibited without written consent of the author. Address inquiries to: hemomi [at] gmail.com. Definitions and wise sayings are from: Hawaiian Dictionary by Pukui and Elbert, 1986. ʻŌlelo Noʻeau – Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings by Mary Kawena Pukui, 1983.

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